Engine Performance Modifications

Contents
I need more power! Are there any cams for my Protegé?
Is there a solid lifter upgrade for the Protegé?
Are there any ECU (PCM) upgrades for the Protegé?
Is it possible to swap in an ECU from the MP3 into my 2.0 liter Protegé (5)?
Are there any headers for the Protegé?
What exhaust systems are available?
Can a Protegé 5's exhaust be fitted into a 4 door Protegé (3rd gen)?
What brand of fluids is the best?
What oil filter is the best?
Who makes the OEM oil filters?
Is it safe to use oil treatment/additives?
What ignition wires are available?
Are there any intake systems available?
I want to use the factory airbox though!
Are there any turbo kits for the Protegé?
Is it true that the Miata uses the same engine as my Protegé? All sorts
  of speed parts are available for Miatas.

Is it true that I can use Ford Escort parts to hot-rod my Protegé?
Can I use MX-6/Ford Probe engine parts for my Protegé?
I am getting a FS-ZE engine for my 3rd generation Protegé, are there any tune up
  parts that I can get before installing the engine?

Is it true that I can use Ford Focus parts to hot-rod my Protegé?
I like the MP3's plastic engine cover, will it fit into my normal Protegé?
What type of catalytic converters does the BJ Protegé use? What effect do they have
  on modifications to the exhaust system?

I really, really want a header for my BJ Protegé. It says above in the "Header" question
  that the primary catalytic converter has to be removed to install a header.  Is there any
  way to install a header and retain the primary catalytic converter?

Will my OBD-II equipped car run without a catalytic converter?
I just installed a homemade/Brand X air intake system on my 95+ OBD-II equipped
  Protegé, and now my “Check Engine” light is lit. What’s going on?

What intake manifolds are available?
Some parts on my FS-ZE intake manifold are faulty, can I replace them?
What is VICS?
What is VTCS?
What is TSCV?
My 2003 Protegé does not apply to the 3005C Intake Manifold Shutter recall, but I'm
  worried that my intake manifold has the same defect. What can I do?

What engines can be swapped into the Protegé?
What engine internal parts are interchangable in the Protegé?
I am rebuilding my FP-DE engine, is there a service manual available?
What is this "stroker kit" from MazdaSpeed I always hear about?
What engine mounts are available for the Protegé?
What does "S-VT" mean?
I live in a warm climate and I race my engine a lot, is there a way I can keep my oil from
  getting too hot?

I hate changing oil on my 2.3l Mazda3, the cartridge filter is messy. Is there anything
  I can do about it?

The stock radiator doesn't cool well enough for my high performance needs, are
  there any radiator upgrades for the Protegé?

I've upgraded the radiator and the engine still gets really hot (almost boil), is there
any way to further improve the cooling?

Are there any underdrive pullies available?
Where is the fuel filter?
My ECU keeps giving me EGR trouble codes, can I get rid of the EGR system?
I am shopping for a good condition used import engine. What are the compression
  pressure test specifications?



I need more power! Are there any cams for my Protegé?
    1st or 2nd Generations: 
     Cam re-grinds are available through Web-Cams or Crower Cams.
     Toda and Gude has made cams for the BP engines, but usually listed under 
     Miata or Ford Escort GT parts. MazdaSpeed also have cams and cam gears
     for the BP-ZE and BP-ZET engine. The part numbers are:
       QEP6-12-420 intake cam (255° duration @ .003, 9mm lift)
       QEP6-12-420 exhaust cam (255° duration @ .003, 9mm lift)
       B6N7-12-42YA cam gear set
       9N2B-12-420 intake cam (unknown specs, for BP-ZET, discontinued)
       9N2B-12-440 exhaust cam (unknown specs, for BP-ZET, discontinued)
     These cams are designed to be used with the stock HLAs.

    3rd Generations:
     Integral used to make aftermarket cams for the FP/FS engines, but they are now
     out of business. MegaCycle Cams has bought the rights from Integral in order
     to continue making these cams, on a special order basis. The Integral cams
     have:
     Stage 1 (Stage 2 turbo) duration: 249.4° @.003" (217° @.050"), 8.79mm lift
     Stage 2 duration: 257.4° @.003" (224.8° @.050"), 9.52mm lift
     Stage 2.5 duration: 261.4° @.003" (227.9" @.050"), 9.52mm lift
     Stage 3 duration: 265.4° @.003" (232.1° @.050"), 9.78mm lift
     Adjustable cam gears are recommended to setup these cams correctly.

     "Twiggy" cams used to be available but they are no longer available. Cam gears
     are a definite must in order for the engine to run correctly. These cams have:
     Intake duration: 252° @.003", 8.763mm lift
     Exhaust duration: 254° @.003", 9.017mm lift

     If you own a car with a 1.8 or 2.0 liter engine, you can also get a factory intake
     cam from the JDM FS-ZE engine (which has a lift of .341 and the duration
     210° @.050). A short run of MazdaSpeed exhaust cams was also recently
     made available for that engine and has a lift of .341, and the duration of 210°
     @.050. The early version of the MazdaSpeed exhaust cam (FS9P-12-440)
     supposedly performs better (by about 1-1.5% @6000rpm) than the revised
     version. A TSB was issued in Japan concerning stalling/idling issues under cold
     engine and/or cold weather situations and thus the exhaust cam timing had to be
     reduced slightly in order to decrease overlap from 17.5° to 10.5°.
     Note that the stock intake cam has
     lift of .341 and a duration of 198° @.050.
     while the stock exhaust cam has
     lift of .322 and a duration of 200° @.050.
     Part numbers as follows:
       FS-ZE intake cam: FSH9-12-420
       MazdaSpeed FS-ZE exhaust cam: FS9P-12-440A (discontinued, clones
          availble from Corksport)
     Cam gears from Tripoint Racing are also available.

     If you have a 1.5 or 1.6 liter engine, the only cam available for it is the factory
     exhaust cam from the 1.5l ZL-VE engine. It has a duration of 240° @.003"
     (stock exhaust cam has 233° @.003") which is a mild performance upgrade
     for these engines when combined with headers. The ZL-VE intake cam will
     not fit due to the end machined for the variable valve timing actuator. The
     part number for the ZL-VE exhaust cam is ZL09-12-440A and will need
     to be imported from Japan. Cam gears might be needed since this cam will
     increase overlap. Cam gears should be available from Corksport.

     Mazda3
     2.0l engine owners can upgrade to the L3-VE exhaust cam. This camshaft
     is equiped from the factory on the NC MX-5 which has a slightly longer
     duration. This exhaust cam has 6° more duration and 1° more overlap from
     the stock cam. The duration is 227° ( @ .003). The overlap is 9° for the
     LF-DE and 5°-35° for the LF-VE. The part number is L309-12-441A.


Is there a solid lifter upgrade for the Protegé?
     All Protegé engines from 1997 onwards utilize solid valve lifters for increased
     reliability due to HLA (hydraulic lash adjuster) failures in high mileage engines
     because of typical owner tendencies to not change the engine oil often enough.
     Regardless of that, solid lifters benefits us with high RPM stability because
     the tendency of valve float occurs at a much higher RPM than HLA lifters.
     Many high performance cams also require stiffer valve springs and solid lifters
     because HLAs cannot keep the proper lash at higher RPMs. Also because
     the newer engines came from the factory with solid lifters, sourcing the parts
     to perform this upgrade is relatively cheap and easy. In order for the proper
     operation of the engine, you will have to replace the cams with the solid lifter
     ones because the ramp angles are significantly different as well as the other
     profile characteristics. This causes unpredictable and unwanted changes in
     lift and duration as a side effect. It can also cause performance loss! Basically,
     what's needed for the upgrade are the cams, lifter buckets, and the shims.
     For the BP-ZE engines (I will list only the 99-00 Miata cams, since the 97-98
       Protegé ones don't give real performance increases):
        BP2Y-12-183 lifter bucket (need 16, and also 16 shims)
        BP4W-12-420 intake cam
          or BP5A-12-420 JDM intake cam (237° vs 241° duration @.003", either
          cam maintains the same 17° overlap)
        BP4W-12-440 exhaust cam
     For the BP-ZET engine:
        BP2Y-12-183 lifter bucket (need 16, and also 16 shims)
        BP5A-12-420 intake cam (from MazdaSpeed Miata)
        BP4W-12-440 exhaust cam
     All Z5-DE engines already have solid lifters. B6-E and BP-ME engines will
     need custom made aftermarket parts.


Are there any ECU (PCM) upgrades?
    Generic piggy back systems are available to wire in to a stock ECU such as an
    APEXi S-AFC. These systems will not work effectively due to Mazda's ECU
    designs. At normal partial throttle operations, the AFC units will
    successfully fool the ECU to supply a different air/fuel mixture. However,
    at full throttle, the ECU has it's own presets to override whatever input
    data is sent. For 3rd generation Protegé's, piggy back systems designed specifically
    for the Protegé such as the Unichip, SplitSecond AFC, or the MPI Tuner (Perfect
    Power SMT6 rebrand) are able to effectively retune the engine to an extent. Some
    controls can still not be completely overriden by these piggy back controllers. The
    only solution to this is to get a complete aftermarket ECU replacement, such as an
    Haltech, MegaSquirt, or SDS. Keep in mind complete replacements removes
    OBD2 emissions monitoring functions, which is illegal in some areas.

    For MazdaSpeed3s, Cobb Tuning's AccessPort or HyperTech's MaxEnergy
    Power Programmer can do a "ROM tune" of the stock ECU by changing the
    tuning maps in the ECU. HyperTech also has applications for the regular Mazda3.


Is it possible to swap in an ECU from the MP3 into my 2.0 liter Protegé (5)?

    It is possible to swap the ECU from the MP3 to the normal 2.0 liter Protegé.
    It has been generally agreed that swapping the ECU is not economically sound
    because of it's meager 10 hp increase. It will definitely be difficult to find one of
    these ECUs at a junk yard. However, if you feel making your Protegé into an
    MP3 replica is your mission, you can always get the ECU from the dealer. As
    with all new factory ECUs, they are very expensive. The MP3 ECU will run you
    close to $1000 from the dealer. If $1000 is chunk change to you, here is the part
    number: FS9N-18-881C. If there is an MP3 owner (who just installed an aftermarket
    turbo kit) who wants to make an ECU trade with you, that will work too. One thing
    to keep in mind is, while the MP3 ECU will work fine on the normal Protegé, the
    normal Protegé's ECU on the MP3 will trigger the "check engine" light due to less
    emission control components (thus "malfunctioning" to the ECU). If you are lucky,
    you may also find this ECU at the junk yard for about $200. Some private parties
    on the forums also have the ability to reflash your normal Protegé's ECU to have
    the MP3's programming. That is the cheapest solution.


Are there any headers for the Protegé?
    1st Generations:
     Yes, Pacesetter makes headers for the BP engines and so does Genie.

    2nd Generations:

     The only headers available are the ones for the BP engine meant for the 1st
     generation Protegé. Even then, you will have to modify the downpipe section for
     it to fit properly. If you are looking for a header for your 1.5 liter engine, sorry there
     aren't any and you will have to have one custom made.

    3rd Generations:

     In a way, no. However, if you intend to have your Protegé off-road, you
     can get a MazdaSpeed or AutoExe 4-2-1 for the 2.0 liter engines (2001+ models).
     The Bosal MX-6/Probe header will also bolt in with some minor modifications.
     There is also the AWR header which is very expensive and is the same one being
     used in the SPEED touring cars.
     This will require the removal of the primary catalytic converter. If you are thinking
     about using this on the street, use at your own risk!
     Here are the part numbers/all the parts you need to get/install the MazdaSpeed header:
        Header: QBJ1-13-450
        Clip: B214-34-C10
        Clip: E356-18-141
        O2 sensor: FS9P-18-861
        Coupler bracket: FS9P-18-998
        Bolt (needs 9): 9979-40-612
        Heat shield: FS9P-13-392B
        Support bracket: FS97-40-070A
        Support bracket: FS97-40-080
        Support bracket: FS97-40-082A
        Bolt (needs 2): 9979-61-020
        Bolt: 9978-40-265
       


What exhaust systems are available?
    As usual, a universal muffler can be welded in place at a decent muffler
    shop.
    For 1st generations:
     Pacesetter cat-back exhaust
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler header-back system (made by Yumex)
       part #: 9BB5-40-100 (discontinued)
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler header-back system for 323 hatchback
       (made by Yumex):
       part #: QSM5-40-100
     MazdaSpeed Stainless & Ceramic Muffler header-back system for GT-X
       hatchback
       part #: 9N2D-40-100 (discontinued)
     MazdaSpeed Stainless & Ceramic Mulffer header-back system for GT-R/GT-Ae
       part #: 9N3D-40-100 (discontinued)
     Brüllen cat-back exhaust
     MazdaSpeed Familia (CustomBuilt) Type A OEM muffler for 323 hatchback
       part #: ZWB1-40-100
    For 2nd Generations: 
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler header-back system (made by Yumex):
       for B5 & BP engine: part #: QDB5-40-100
       for Z5 engine: part #: 9DBZ-40-100 (discontinued)
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler header-back system for 323 hatchback
       (made by Yumex):
       for B5 & BP engine: part #: 9DE5-40-100 (discontinued)
       for Z5 engine: part #: 9DEZ-40-100 (discontinued)
    For 3rd generations:
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler for Familia S-Wagon (made by Yumex):
       part # QBG5-40-100
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler for Familia Sedan (made by Yumex):
       part # QBJ1-40-100
     MazdaSpeed Familia muffler (made by Yumex):
       part #: FSH2-40-100C
     Mazda MP3 (manufactured by Racing Beat) muffler:
       for Protegé: part # 0000-8M-C08
     MazdaSpeed USA sport muffler (manufactured by Bosal):
       for Protegé: part # 0000-8M-C09
       for Protegé 5: part # 0000-8M-C10
     2003 MazdaSpeed Protegé (manufactured by Racing Beat) muffler:
       for Protegé: part # 0000-88-C14
     2003.5 MazdaSpeed Protegé (manufactured by Racing Beat) muffler:
       for Protegé: part # 0000-88-C15
     Racing Beat cat-back exhaust (2001-2003 only)
     Borla cat-back exhaust
     Bosal cat-back exhaust
     Ziel Motorsports N1 style cat-back exhaust system-- available in various sizes.
     Mint Blue muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     5Zigen muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     GReddy cat-back exhaust: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     Trust Power Extreme II muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     Trust MX Muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     AutoExe muffler
     Tanabe Hyper Wagon muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     APEXi N1 muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     RS-R ExMag GT II cat-back exhaust: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     Data System Basstar Euro muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
     ZEES Ex Project Granble Ex Wagon muffler: will fit only on Protegé 5s.
    For Mazda3:
     AutoExe muffler
     MazdaSpeed Sport Sound Muffler cat-back exhaust (made by Yumex):
       for 2003-2006 hatchback part #:  QBK1-40-100
       for 2007-2008 hatchback part #: QBK2-40-100
     MazdaSpeed USA cat-back exhaust (manufactured by Bosal):
       for sedan: part # GRMS-8M-L01
       for hatchback: part # GRMS-8M-L02
       for MazdaSpeed3: part # GRMS-8M-L26
     Racing Beat cat-back exhaust


Can a Protegé 5's exhaust be fitted into a 4 door Protegé (3rd gen)?
    Theoretically it can be done, but it is more trouble than it is worth.
    The Protegé 5 is actually a shorter car than the 4 door Protegé, this will
    mean the exhaust hangers and piping lengths will be different. It is better
    to get an exhaust system specifically designed for the Protegé 5. However,
    if you insist; exhaust hangs and piping will have to be extended or cut.
    Make sure this work is done at a good muffler shop.


What brand of fluids is the best?
    "Best" is a very subjective term. One will want decent performance at a
    reasonable price. As such, recommending a certain motor oil brand or
    transmission fluid will not be done. This is a very heated and opinionated
    discussion about which brand is better. However, it is suggested that you
    find an August and October 2000 issue of Motorcycle Consumer News. They
    have 2 articles about motor oils. They have run true scientific tests and
    do not appear to be biased towards a brand. The articles also offer lots
    of interesting tidbits about motor oils. The information is biased towards
    motorcycles however. Do not let that stop you, motorcycles are beginning to
    demand lubricants similar to automobile engines. This is in part due to
    the increasing use of 4 stroke engines in motorcycles. Use this
    information to help you decide what is "bang for the buck" for you. In a
    way, go with your gut feeling.

    There is 1 thing that I will down right, flat out tell you NOT to use.
    DO NOT use Slick-50! What they tell you can pretty much go out the window.
    Slick-50's formulation has small pieces of Teflon with high quality
    mineral (dino) oil. According to Dupont, Teflon is not meant to go into
    machinery. Teflon is indeed a non-binding compound, which makes it very
    ideal to go on your non-stick frying pan. Teflon is also a solid 
    material, meaning they will not go between your engine parts. Instead, the
    Teflon pieces will get flushed out into your oil filter the first time
    you crank your engine after you change your oil, leaving you with just
    normal high quality non-synthetic oil! The oil filter's life maybe reduced
    because it is now clogged with the Teflon pieces and may pose
    oil pressure and filtering problems. For detailed information about this, go to
    http://www.vtr.org/maintain/oil-additives.html.

    There is only 1 thing almost all racers will agree on: Motul 600 DOT 4 
    brake fluid. The fluid appears to be extremely resistant to air
    penetration and performance is excellent. Brake pedal feel will be firm
    and lasts a long time even after hard use. If you are on a budget, Ford
    Racing's high performance brake fluid is almost as good as the Motul 600.
    The Ford fluid should be available at your local Ford dealership. If you
    don't ever plan on racing, Valvoline Syn-Power DOT 4 will work just fine
    and is almost as good as Ford Racing's and is even cheaper.


What oil filter is the best?
    Again, "best" is a very subjective term. It is generally recommended that
    you use the OEM oil filters because they are built to Mazda's engineering
    specs. Your dealer may have a on going special deal when you buy the OEM
    oil filters. My dealer gives 1 free oil filter if you buy 2. This runs me
    about 15 dollars. If you want to go with an aftermarket oil filter, be
    sure to check out this site:
    http://www.frankhunt.com/FRANK/corvette/articles/oilfilterstudy/oilfilterstudy.html
    It has detailed information about most major aftermarket brands. After reading this
    you will see not all oil filters are the same! 

    Something that you should also know (regardless of which generation and engine
    you have): for better filtration capabilities and possibly longer filtration life, you can
    use a filter from a Mazda K-series V6 engine. Remember when you are using a larger
    oil filter, you will have to add a bit more oil into your engine! The larger 626/Millenia/
    929 oil filter costs the same as the (original) factory size one.


Who makes the OEM oil filters?
    Depending on the batch you get at your dealer, they will either be made by
    Tennex (US made), Tokyo Roki (Japanese made), or Knecht-Mahle (Austrian made),
    or Purolator (US made). The oil filters sold by the Canadian dealerships are either
    made by Tennex (US made), or Allied-Signal (the company that makes Fram filters).


Is it safe to use oil treatment/additives?
    Generally speaking, they do more harm than good and are a waste of your money.
    Street use engine oil already have the necessary additives and detergents to do what
    the additive treatments claim. Go to this site
    http://www.vtr.org/maintain/oil-additives.html for a detailed explaination.


What ignition wires are available?

    Magnecor, MSD and Crane have wires available for the Protegé. NGKs are
    available for most 1st and 2nd generations as well as 3rd generaions. Nology also
    has wires and coil pack relocation kit for the 2.0l (FS) engine. There are also wires
    made by Nagai Electronic in Japan. They have wires available for the 1st and 2nd
    generation's 1.8l DOHC (BP) engine, 3rd generation's 2.0l engine, and the BG
    chassis 323 1.6l engine. AutoExe makes wires for all 3rd generations in the 9mm
    diameter. You will have to find an importer who will import the wires for you.NGK
    has the following applications:
      BP-ZE/BP-ZET: part # RC-ZX18
      B6: part # RC-ZX39
      BP-ZE (2nd generations): part # RC-ZE36
      Z5-DE : RC-ZE37
      ZL/ZM: part # RC-ZE53
      FP-DE: part # RC-ZX52
      FS-DE/FS-ZE: part # RC-ZE76
    NGK also has their performance line called "PowerCables":
      BP-ZE/BP-ZET: part # 02Z
      BP-ZE (2nd generations): part # 08Z
      ZL/ZM: part # 07Z
      FS-DE/FS-ZE: part # 29Z


Are there any intake systems available?
    Not much is available for the 1st Gen Protegé's. Weapon-R makes one, but
    the fit and size is not ideal at all. PRM has a cold air extension, but it's
    slightly pricey. Compass Motorsports (www.compassmotorsports.com ) has released 
    it's cold air extension that is much better priced than the PRM and will soon 
    release the upper tube completing the system. Each piece can be purchased 
    separately to keep on budgets. Ideal piping size if your making a custom intake is 
    2.5" inner diameter.

    You might find unbranded intake systems on EBay, but the best system available for the
    2nd generations is the Simota intake.

    For 3rd generations, Injen has made an intake for the whole 3rd generation engine lineup.
    There is a known issue with the Injen 1.6l intake due to machining imperfections at the MAF
    sensor flange, vacuum leak may result after the Injen intake is installed. This will cause
    hesitation issues and may also cause the MAF to fail. The 1.6l ZM-DE MAF has known
    issues and a recall was issued on it. Be sure to apply silicon sealant at the MAF flange to
    avoid these problems and to enjoy the benefits from this intake!
    An HKS super mega flow intake will fit into the FP-DE, FS-DE and FS-DET also.
    AEM has released a short ram intake for both the FP and FS engines. Mad House
    Productions also has an intake system for the 2001+ 2.0 liter models. There is also have a
    cold air extension that features a coolant reservoir relocation kit to make use of the hole
    that leads to the fender well at the left side of the car.
    AutoExe makes a carbon fiber ram air intake kit for the FS/FP and LF/L3/L5 engined cars.
    Simota has a knock off carbon fiber ram air intake for the FS/FP and LF/L3/L5 engined cars

    For the Mazda3, MazdaSpeed USA now offers a cold air intake that is legal for all states.
    The part number is: GRMS-8M-L30. For the MazdaSpeed3 the part number is
    GRMS-8M-L29. If you have an early production intake for the MazdaSpeed3, you will need
    to add an air flow straightener in order to prevent false "check engine" lights from occuring.
    The air flow straightener GRMS-8M-L39 is now included with all current intake kits for the
    MazdaSpeed3's. Do NOT use a K&N or any other oiled air filter cleaner for this intake or
    you will damage the filter! Use the MazdaSpeed filter cleaning kit, part number
    GRMS-8M-Z99! If your filter is damaged in any way, a replacement part GRMS-8M-L09 is
    available from Mazda.


I want to use the factory airbox though!
    You can get a K&N drop-in filter for the Protegé and Protegé5. They should fit all models
    of the Protegé. The part number for the 1st generation is 33-2034 and for 2nd & 3rd
    generations, it is 33-2134. For the BJ chassis (3rd generation) cars with the B3-ME engine,
    the K&N drop-in filter is 33-2824. For the Mazda3 2.0L and 2.3L it is 33-2293. They
    should be available from any auto parts store. K&N (and similar design) filters are not
    recommended for the Mazda3's by Mazda because the filter's oils could easily damage the
    MAF sensor and any issues relating to it won't be covered by warranty. The only dry element
    drop-in filter known for the Mazda3 is the Blitz Sus Power LM air filter. The part number is
    SA-16B and SA-17B for i-stop equipped models. MazdaSpeed also has 3 layer foam filters
    with embroidered logo in the middle of the filter element available for all Protegé's.
    The part numbers are:
      QE1D-13-321 1st generations (not compatible with GT-X/GT-R/GT-Ae)
      QD1D-13-321 2nd and 3rd generations
    The MazdaSpeed filter for the Mazda3 does not use the 3 layer foam material. It is believed
    to be a paper element. The part number is QBK1-13-Z40 for the 2.0L and 2.3L engines.


Are there any turbo kits for the Protegé?

    1st generation Protegé's can swap their engines to a BP-T turbo engine from a 323
    GT-X/GT-R. You can also add just the turbo and manifold to your N/A BP engine,
    along with a front mount intercooler and other add on electronics. If you have a GT-X
    engine already, there is also a turbocharger and exhaust manifold upgrade from MazdaSpeed.
    The part number is 9N2D-13-700 for a VJ22 turbo with an A/R of 20. There is also a bigger
    one with an A/R of 25. The part number is 9N2A-13-700. These turbos are designed to be
    used with the MazdaSpeed exhaust manifold also (9N2A-13-600). It is recommended to use
    the MazdaSpeed tuned ECU, sensors, and cams also. 9N2D-18-800 for the ECU,
    9N2D-18-210 for the boost sensor, 9N2D-18-840 for the air temperature sensor, and
    9N2D-18-750 for the map switch. These parts are no longer available new unfortunately.
    Check out Gro Harlem's 1st generation modification page for other information. There are no
    turbo kits at all for the 2nd generations, so everything will have to be custom made. For 3rd
    generations' 2.0 liter engined cars, there is the Tri-point turbo kit, Flyin' Protegé turbo kit,
    Spool turbo kit, the Hiboost turbo kit, and the Mental Addiction Motorsports turbo kit.
    Hiboost also makes a turbo kit for the 1.6l engined cars.


Is it true that the Miata uses the same engine as my Protegé? All sorts 
of speed parts are available for Miatas.
    The 94-97 1.8L Miata uses an engine that is basically similar to the BP
    engine found in the 1990-1998 1.8L DOHC Protegé (the 1999-2000 1.8L DOHC
    Protegé engine is completely different, despite similar specs). The Miata
    engine has the same cams and a slightly less restrictive intake and
    exhaust manifolds than a Protegé, resulting in slightly higher stock
    horsepower (128 to 133 hp vs. 122 to 125 hp). All internal parts (such as 
    cams and pistons) that will fit on a Miata will also work on a Protegé.

    However, the Miata is a RWD car with a traditional longitudinally mounted
    engine (i.e. it is mounted front-to-back rather than sideways). Due to this
    difference, the Miata's engine accessories (power steering pump, A/C
    compressor, alternator etc.) all mount in different places. The Miata
    throttle body faces the other end of the engine, so a Miata intake manifold
    will not work on a Protegé without serious custom fabrication. The Miata 
    exhaust manifold exits towards the flywheel end of the engine rather than
    wrapping underneath the oil pan like a FWD Protegé. Last but not least, the
    Miata uses a distributorless coil-pack ignition system rather than the
    tradition distributor-based system found in the Protegé.

    A 94-97 Miata engine will physically bolt into a Protegé, but you will need
    to obtain all the correct Protegé accessory parts, intake and exhaust
    manifolds, and ignition parts in order to make the engine fit. Keen observers
    will notice that swapping back to Protegé parts eliminates one of the
    advantages of using a Miata engine; the better manifolds. Also, none of the
    turbo and supercharger kits available for the Miata will fit directly on a
    Protegé. Most of the turbo kits could be made to fit if you replace all the
    plumbing, but it hardly seems worth the effort to pay $3000 for a turbo kit
    and then throw out most of it; you're better off getting a custom system. The
    popular Jackson Racing (formerly Sebring) Miata supercharger kit will not fit
    at all due to clearance problems.

    The 1999-2000 BP-ZE Miata engine is similar to the 1994-1997 Miata/Protegé
    motor, but Mazda repositioned the intake ports slightly higher on the
    cylinder head for increased power. Compression was also raised from 9:1 to
    9.5:1. For Miata owners, this is good, but it's bad for Protegé fans because
    a Protegé intake manifold will not fit on this cylinder head. Therefore, you
    are stuck with a throttle body that faces the wrong end of the engine. To 
    date, this engine has not been sold in a FWD car anywhere in the world, so
    there is no easy way to work around this problem. 

    However, stock 1999-2000 Miata cams make more power than 1994-97 Miata or 
    1990-1998 Protegé cams, and they will fit directly into the earlier engines.
    They are cheaper than any aftermarket cams and make a great "low-buck" cam
    swap. You must switch to solid valve lifters used in the 1999-2000 BP-ZE engine to
    take full advantage of these cams.


Is it true that I can use Ford Escort parts to hot-rod my Protegé?

    Yes! The 1991-1996 Ford Escort GT, Escort LXE, and Mercury Tracer LTS share
    the 1.8L DOHC BP engine with the 1990-1998 Protegé 1.8L DOHC. The suspension
    of these cars is basically similar to the 1990-1994 BG Protegé. Most engine
    and chassis parts are fully interchangeable.

    The 1997+ Ford Escort still shares the same basic suspension layout with the
    BG Protegé, and most parts are directly interchangeable. However, the newer
    DOHC Escorts, including the ZX2 and "Sport" sedan, use the Ford Zetec 2.0L
    powerplant, so engine parts will no longer interchange.

    European 323 owners should note that the car sold in North America as the
    Escort has nothing in common with the European Escort. I am not sure if any
    Euro Escort parts will interchange with any Protegé or 323.


Can I use MX-6/Ford Probe engine parts for my Protegé?
    None of the 1st generation MX-6/Probe engine parts are interchangable with any
    Protegé. Only the 2nd generation base model MX-6/Probe engine parts will work
    with the 3rd generation 1.8l/2.0l models. The cylinder head from the MX-6/Probe
    is not directly interchangable with the Protegé 's due to the fact that there is a hole
    to mount a distributor on the MX-6/Probe but not on the Protegé. It is not
    advisible to use stock components from the MX-6/Probe's engine because
    many of the Protegé's parts supercede them with stronger/updated versions. Only
    aftermarket performance parts are advisible.


I am getting a FS-ZE engine for my 3rd generation Protegé, are there any tune up
parts that I can get before installing the engine?
    There's not much you can really do, but you can get Mazdaspeed pistons and
    an exhaust cam which are meant to go with the FS-ZE. A heavy duty Mazdaspeed
    thermostat is also available. You may also want to bolt on the MazdaSpeed
    chromoly flywheel before installing the engine also.


Is it true that I can use Ford Focus parts to hot-rod my Protegé?
    No! The Focus has absolutely nothing in common with the Protegé. Persistent
    rumors have been floating around the Internet that the Focus is a re-bodied
    Protegé (or vice versa), or that the Protegé uses a Focus engine. These 
    rumors seem to have been started by some erroneous automotive press reports
    before the release of the 2001+ 2.0L Protegé. They are totally untrue. The
    Protegé shares no parts with the Focus, and the 2.0L engine is an F-series
    Mazda, not a Ford Zetec, so no parts will interchange.


I like the MP3's plastic engine cover, will it fit into my normal Protegé?
    Yes, if you have a 2.0 liter FS engine it will fit. You will need to get the
    valve cover from the MP3 also. The MP3's valve cover has 4 studs on there
    that allows the bolt on of the plastic cover.


What type of catalytic converters does the BJ Protegé use? What effect do they have
on modifications to the exhaust system?

    All U.S.-model BJ Protegé's use a “can”-style primary catalytic converter that attaches
    directly to the exhaust manifold, right behind the radiator.  The primary and secondary
    O2 sensors attach to the exhaust system immediately before and after the primary
    converter.  After the primary converter, there is a cast-iron downpipe (referred to in
    the service manual as a “connecting pipe”) which wraps under the oil pan and ends
    directly behind the engine.

    After the downpipe, 99-00 Protegés sold in states other than New York and California
    (referred to as “48-state” cars) use a single-piece exhaust system that incorporates two
    mufflers.  The first muffler is a small resonator located under the front seats (sometimes
    mistaken for a catalytic converter); the main muffler is located at the rear of the car.
    Aftermarket “cat-back” exhaust systems for 48-state cars replace the entire system
    after the downpipe.

    1999-2000 Protegés sold in New York and California and all 2001+ Protegés use a
    2-piece exhaust system after the downpipe.  The first section incorporates a secondary
    catalytic converter necessary to meet more stringent ULEV emissions standards.  This
    converter is located behind the engine.  The second section bolts to the first section at
    a flange located underneath the front seats, and incorporates two mufflers similar to
    those used on 48-state cars. Aftermarket “cat-back” exhaust systems for these cars
    only replace the second section of the stock exhaust system, leaving the secondary
    catalytic converter in place.


I really, really want a header for my BJ Protegé. It says above in the "Header" question
that the primary catalytic converter has to be removed to install a header.  Is there any
way to install a header and retain the primary catalytic converter?

    The primary converter cannot be retained in its stock location when using a
    conventional long-tube header.  The only conceivable way to leave it in place is to
    use a “shorty” style header such as those available for the Ford Focus or 01+ Honda
    Civic.  There are no “shorty” headers currently available for the BJ Protegé, and there
    may be a good reason for this- they usually don’t make much power. They are
    generally considered to be a poor substitute for a genuine long-tube header. According
    to Racing Beat and Vaughn Nishimura, the "shorty" header that was tested on the
    Protegé gave no power gains at all. However, if someone can shorty header that is
    proven to make decent horsepower, this may be the best option from a legal standpoint.

    A long-tube header can only be used on a BJ Protegé if the primary converter is
    relocated or replaced.  If the stock ECU is used, the car must have a catalytic converter
    somewhere or the OBDII system will figure out that something is wrong and turn on the
    “Check Engine” light.  A popular way to work around this problem on other cars is to
    install a long-tube header, then install a generic high-flow “bullet”-style catalytic
    converter after the header collector and weld new O2 sensor bungs before and after the
    new converter.  The wires to the stock O2 sensors can then be lengthened to allow the
    sensors to be installed in the new bungs.  This will usually fool the computer into thinking
    that everything is OK, and cars with this mod will often pass tailpipe-sniffer emissions
    tests. A harness extender cable from the MazdaSpeed Protegé can be used to easily
    lengthen the O2 sensor wiring. The part number is BPY1-67-020

    The only problem with this approach is that its legality is questionable.  In states with
    stringent emissions laws, such as California, no modifications to anything emissions
    related are allowed without explicit State approval.  Illegal modifications can result in
    huge fines and possible impoundment of your car.

    However, states with less stringent laws may be more forgiving.  For instance, Texas law
    allows parts of the emissions system to be changed as long as the performance of the new
    parts is “equally effective” as the stock system (please see
    http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/oprd/rules/pdflib/114b.pdf ).  This may allow your header
    equipped Protegé to pass inspection, but you may still encounter problems.  Most states
    require hefty fines for anyone who sells a car known to have emissions system problems.
    If you sell your Protegé with the header installed and the car subsequently fails inspection,
    it could result in a lawsuit and/or criminal prosecution.  Make sure that you check your
    local laws before modifying anything, keep the stock parts, and be prepared to reinstall
    them in case you run into problems.


Will my OBD-II equipped car run without a catalytic converter?

    In most cases, the car will run fine; however, the “Check Engine” light will be eternall
    lit. This will cause your car to fail inspection, and may mask other engine problems unless
    you regularly scan the OBD-II system to ensure that it is not detecting any problems other
    than the converter.  Also, remember that operating a Protegé on public roads in the U.S.
    without a functional catalytic converter is illegal in every state. Removing the converter
    should only be considered on a race car that is never driven on the street.


I just installed a homemade/Brand X air intake system on my 95+ OBD-II equipped
Protegé, and now my “Check Engine” light is lit. What’s going on?
    The OBD-II system is programmed run self diagnostics to detect problems with the
    sensors in your car. The Protegé has 2 sensors located in the intake: the Intake Air
    Temperature (IAT) sensor, which (logically) measures the temperature of incoming air,
    and the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor, which measures the amount of air entering the
    engine.  The IAT sensor is the small 2-wire sensor that attaches to the intake pipe
    immediately behind the stock air filter.  The MAF sensor is the large, box-shaped, multi-
    wire sensor located between the stock air filter and the throttle body.

    Most “Check Engine” light problems on an OBD-II Protegé are caused by the MAF
    sensor.  The Protegé uses a MAF sensor that is very sensitive to air turbulence.  In
    order to minimize turbulence, the pipes leading into and out of the MAF sensor should
    be as close as possible to the diameter of the stock intake pipes, they should be as
    straight as possible, and any bends should be smooth and uniform in diameter. Any
    sudden kinks, enlargements, or contractions in the intake pipe can disturb the air
    flowing into the MAF sensor, causing irregular sensor output and making the OBD-II
    system think that the sensor is broken.

    Although it is less common, installing the IAT sensor incorrectly can also cause the
    “Check Engine” light to come on.  The end of the IAT sensor must be installed some
    where in the airstream leading into the MAF sensor. It does not matter exactly where it
    is installed; some Protegé owners have simply shoved the entire IAT sensor into th
    inside of a cone filter and routed the wires under the filter gasket, and have not
    encountered any problems. However, the IAT sensor should –not- be unplugged,
    removed, or simply left dangling in the middle of the engine compartment. This can
    cause “Check Engine” lights and/or decreased engine performance.


What intake manifolds are available?
    1st generations:

       None are available for the B6 engines, however BP-ME (1.8l SOHC) owners can swap
       out their restrictive intake manifold in favor of the BP-ZE's (1.8l DOHC) manifold. You
       will need an RPM activation trigger to power the VICS solenoid as well as some dyno
       tuning. BP engine owners can use the intake manifold from the 323 GT-R's BP-ZET
       engine (part # BPC8-13-100). The GT-R's intake manifold does flow a lot better and
       is specifically designed for turbo applications, but nothing else is known about it.
       Do note that the GT-R's and GT-X's intake manifold does not have VICS.
       MazdaSpeed did make a 4 barrel throttle kit for the Miata BP-ZE but you maybe
       able to rotate the plenum to have the air hose inlet facing the other way so that an air
       air filter assembly can be used in the stock location. The kit is no longer made but it
       was last seen being sold used for around $1300. The part number is 9EP5-13-000.
       It has 43mm throttle bodies, and 40mm velocity stacks.
    2nd generations:
       Sorry, there are none for the 1.5l (Z5) engine. What will work on the 1st generation's
       BP engines should work with the 2nd generation's BP engine. The 2nd generation's
       BP intake manifold is different than the 1st generation's and flows slightly better.
    3rd generations:
       1.6l (ZM) owners can upgrade to the European spec intake manifold which features
       VICS. You will need an RPM activation trigger to power the VICS solenoid as well
       as some dyno tuning. Here are the part numbers:
         ZM39-13-130A intake manifold plenum
         ZM39-13-100B intake manifold runners
         ZM39-13-135A intake manifold plenum gasket
         ZM39-13-121 intake manifold support bracket
         9994-00-801 nut (need 4)
         9979-40-830 bolt (need 6)
         9979-41-030 bolt
         HE41-13-995 check valve
         BP5W-18-741 vacuum solenoid
         JE97-18-837B solenoid bracket
         9979-40-612 bolt (need 2)
         9994-00-600 nut
         FS35-13-524A EGR pipe plug
       The stock throttle body, throttle cable bracket, and fuel rail are to be reused.
       Installation of this intake manifold on ULEV models will result in the removal of the
       EGR system and VTCS. It may also cause clearance issues with some strut tower
       bars (such as the OEM one). Vacuum lines are not listed in order to lower parts
       costs. Generic ones can be easily sourced.
       1.8l (FP) and 2.0l (FS) owners:
       The JDM FS-ZE's intake manifold can be swapped in to help improve top end
       performance. The FS-ZE's intake manifold has some basic resonance tuning due to
       the addition of the resonance chamber bolted on top of the runners (it is actually
       connected to the plenum log chamber). Several modifications to the vacuum line
       routing will have to be performed when installing the FS-ZE intake manifold to either
       of the US spec engines. First, the early FS-ZE's intake manifold does not have a
       fitting for the boost sensor (only the 2003s did). For semi-legal emissions
       effectiveness and to avoid the "Check Engine" light to come on, you will need the
       JDM EGR pipe (FSN7-20-310A). The JDM fuel rail also does not have the fuel
       line pulsation damper built in, unlike the US fuel rail. The fuel line pulsation damper
       on the FS-ZE is actually located slightly upstream in the fuel line (inlet side) as an
       external unit. Because of this, you will have to use aftermarket fuel lines for the
       short section between the firewall and the fuel rail in order to use the pulsation
       damper (BP4X-20-180). Here are the complete part number list for the 2003 FS-ZE
       intake manifold setup:
         FS8T-13-130 lower intake manifold
         FSN7-13-100H upper intake manifold
         FS2V-13-19X resonance chamber
         FS1E-13-150B fuel rail
         FSN7-20-310A EGR pipe
         FSN7-13-135 upper/lower intake manifold gasket
         BP4X-20-180 fuel line pulsation damper
         FP34-18-838E knock sensor harness bracket (requires 9979-40-814 bolt)
         FSN7-13-665 throttle cable bracket
         FSN7-18-740 fuel pressure regulator solenoid & bracket
         B66S-18-740 VICS solenoid & bracket
         FSN7-20-370C VICS vacuum hoses
         FSJ2-20-381B fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose
       Also, installing the intake manifold on a normal Protegé 2.0l (and 1.6l CA spec) will
       mean the loss of the VTCS emissions control component. Installing the intake
       manifold on a "48 state" 1.6l Protegé and a MP3 will not have this issue. The intake
       manifold found on the stock 2.0l and 1.6l CA spec Protegé's have the VTCS
       component designed to control cold start emissions to help achieve the ULEV
       emissions standard. This same system also causes some minor restrictions and air
       turbulence in the intake manifold runners. Changing out the intake manifold to one
       that does not have VTCS will offer some minor performance improvement however
       the vehicle will no longer be emissions legal. The intake manifold from the "48 state"
       1.6l Protegé and the MP3 does not have VTCS.
    Mazda3's:
       The JDM intake manifold can be installed to eliminate the electronic throttle system
       and convert to a conventional cable throttle system. You will need to run the Aust-
       ralian or Japanese spec ECU to prevent the "Check Engine" light from coming on.
       The alternative is to run an aftermarket ECU and with this conversion, will increase
       ease of tuning. The following parts are needed:
         BP4L-41-600B accelerator pedal
         BP4T-41-660F throttle cable
         BP4S-41-670 throttle cable bracket
         9978-60-616 bolt (need 2)
         9979-60-816 bolt
         9994-00-601 nut (need 3)
         LF60-13-640A throttle body
         9XF0-02-14X9 bolt (need 4)
         ZJ01-20-660 idle air control valve
         LF51-13-660A throttle cable bracket
         9XF0-02-14X9 bolt (need 2)
         9979-40-616G bolt (need 3)
       If you have a LF-DE (2.0L) engine:
         LF60-13-100 intake manifold
       If you have a L3-VE (2.3L) engine:
         L323-13-100C intake manifold


Some parts on my FS-ZE intake manifold are faulty, can I replace them?

    Yes, some difficult to determine wear and tear parts are replacable which can restore
    your expensive intake manifold back to optimal operation! Here are the part numbers:
       BP6F-20-170 VICS actuator
       Z520-20-132 VICS shutter valve retaining ring
       FSN7-13-163 resonance chamber o'ring
       FSN7-13-135 upper/lower intake manifold gasket


What is VICS?
    VICS is "Variable Inertia Charging System" and is also refered to as "Variable Intake
    Control System". In conventional intake manifolds, they are designed to have an air flow
    compromise between low end and top end power. Because of this compromise, power
    delivery from the engine is not optimum nor ideal. What some manufacturers (such as
    Nissan and Mazda for example) have done is designed the intake manifold to have an
    isolated runner system (there are many types of intake manifolds) to offer the best flow
    characteristics. They didn't stop there. To squeeze as much power out of the engine, yet
    allowing the vehicle to be streetable and mass producable, they added a secondary set
    of intake runners into the manifold. With this dual runner system, there is the long runner
    system for low to mid level RPM operation, and the short runner system for high RPMs.
    On Mazda's dual runner intake systems (hereafter refered to as "VICS"), they designed
    the long runners to be narrow and oval in shape to help promote air velocity at the lower
    RPM ranges. As for the short runners, they are much larger and circular in shape to allow
    for maximum flow capability at high RPM. There are butterfly shutter valves fitted over
    the short runner and they are normally closed off. When engine speed is reached to a
    predetermined rate by the ECU, a solenoid valve is opened and vacuum opens the
    butterflies to allow for additional air flow into the engine. Hence the reason why the
    system is "variable". It allows for optimum drivabilty and performance at most RPM
    ranges. Note when this system is used with high boost forced induction systems, they
    hinder performance rather than aid it because of the runner sizes. For high boost
    applications, it is recommended that a large single (stage) isolated runner intake manifold
    be used.


What is VTCS?
    VTCS is "Variable Tumble Control System" or commonly refered to as swirl control
    valves. This system only exists on the 3rd generation ULEV certified cars and is used
    only on engine cold starts (under the following criteria: coolant temperature is less than
    65°C/149°F). When active, the butterflies located at the end of the intake runners are
    closed leaving a small notch aproximately 1/4 the size of the runners to allow for
    turbulent air flow to reach the head and combustion chamber. The swirl caused by the
    turbulent air aids the combustion process when the engine is still in its cold state "rich
    fuel mixture" condition, therefore reducing cold start emissions. Hydrocarbon emissions
    are significantly reduced due to this system. This system is also the cause of the infamous
    cold start engine rattle that seem to happen between 2500-2800rpm on some 2.0l
    engines. There is no known legal fix to this issue yet and Mazda is aware of the problem.
    What is happening on the few 2.0l engines is normal and there is no need to worry. The
    inclusion of this system also causes some performance restriction to the engine even when
    the system is inactive.


What is TSCV?
    It basically works in the same way as VTCS does, except TSCV works in all operating
    ranges instead of being used soley for cold start emission purposes (what VTCS did).


My 2003 Protegé does not apply to the 3005C Intake Manifold Shutter recall, but I'm
worried that my intake manifold has the same defect. What can I do?

    Your Protegé does not apply to the recall because Mazda has determined that when your
    car was manufactured, the defective intake manifolds were not used. This maybe untrue
    however since several owners have reported the same issues as what is outlined in the
    recall but their car does not apply to it. There are only two options for you in this case:
    do nothing and most likely nothing will happen, however when it does hope that your car
    is still under warranty and a Mazda dealership will perform the necessary repairs for you.
    Or take preventative measures by following everything mentioned in the recall
    proceedures at your own expense. If you have determined on your own that the intake
    manifold's shutter valve screws are loose, you will need to replace the screws. You will
    need to order the recall gasket kit FSY1-13-SRZ. The kit's contents are:
      FSJ2-13-111A intake manifold gasket
      FS7N-13-135 intake manifold plenum gasket
      JE27-20-305A EGR valve gasket
      FP87-13-655 throttle body gasket
      FS1J-20-109 shutter valve screws (16)
    If the screws or shutter valves are missing, then engine damage may have occured. If no
    engine damage has occured, then the intake manifold will need to be replaced with
    FSY3-13-SRY. It retails for approximately $220 USD which is a substantial discount
    from a regular replacement intake manifold.

    If you have a MazdaSpeed Protegé, it does not apply to the recall at all because the
    intake manifold shutter design is different and is more robust.

    A similar recall was also issued for the European market for both the FS-DE and ZM-DE
    engines. The European (and Chinese) ZM-DE features a VICS intake manifold not found
    anywhere else. The same manufacturing defect that plagued many FS-DE engines also
    existed in the European (and perhaps Chinese) ZM-DE engines. A price reduced special
    EDM ZM-DE intake manifold were issued under the part number ZMZ2-13-SRY. For the
    intake manifolds without missing screws, the gasket kit ZMZ1-13-SRY is available. The
    kit contents are:
      ZL01-13-111 intake manifold gasket
      ZM39-13-135A intake manifold plenum gasket
      B6BF-13-655 throttle body gasket
                             shutter valve screws (8)

    For the European FS-DE, a price reduced special intake manifold was issued under part
    number FSY4-13-SRY. If there are no missing screws, then the gasket kit can be used.
    The gasket kit FSY2-13-SRY contents are:
      FSJ2-13-111A intake manifold gasket
      FSN7-13-135 intake manifold plenum gasket
      JE27-20-305A EGR valve gasket
      FP87-13-655 throttle body gasket
      FS2J-20-109 shutter valve screws (8)

    Since the Mazda Europe recall information is not available, use the Mazda USA's 3005C
    repair information to help perform your repairs.


What engines can be swapped into the Protegé?
    Please note all swap info only focus on manual transmission cars.
    1st generations:
       1st generation cars can swap the entire powertrain to either the BP-ZET (1.8l DOHC
       Turbo), KL-DE, KF-ZE, KL-ZE, or *FE-ZE (aka FE3). B6-E and BP-ME equiped
       cars can also swap the powertrain to the one offered in the Protegé LX (BP-ZE 1.8l
       DOHC) at a relatively low cost.

        K-series engines will require the crossmember, engine mounts, axles, transmission,
        and all other related parts for a relatively "bolt-on" installation. A custom radiator
        maybe required or desired to increase room between the engine and the radiator.
        Aftermarket fans are required regardless of radiator replacement or not.

       *Note for these engines, custom fabrication of mounts will be required. The FE-ZE
        2.0l DOHC engine is basically a "giant" version of the BP engine which means all
        the parts are bigger while extremely similar to the 1.8l cousin. The mount locations are
        also in similar places, allowing an almost straighforward swap. Although, "FE-ZE" is the
        official code for the 170hp 2.0l DOHC engine, it is most commonly refered to as the
        "FE3" due to the castings on the block.
    2nd generations:
       Although 2nd generations have significantly smaller engine bays, performing swaps are
       not impossible at all. In fact, the physical portion of the swaps are very straight forward
       and almost Honda-like! The only economically viable swap candidate for the 2nd
       generations are the BP engines. Although there were actually 2nd generations equiped
       with the BP-ZE, they are very rare. The majority of the 2nd generations sold were ones
       equiped with the Z5-DE engine. Owners with the BP-ZE engines have only one very
       obvious thing to do: either turbo the stock engine, or swap in the BP-ZET.

       Owners with Z5-DE engines will have a very interesting task on their hands when
       performing the swap-- transmissions. Contrary to popular belief, the 1995 model was
       the only year that the 2nd generations receive the G25M-R transmission. This trans-
       mission is more favored due to its tollerances to higher engine power. All 1996-1998
       models received only the F25M-R transmission which is generally regarded as weaker.
       First, you will have to find out what year and car # your car is (super easy). Then you
       will have to decide which transmission you want to use. Regardless of which year your
       car is, using the G25M-R transmission will mean more parts required to install the
       engine and transmission versus the F25M-R. It is strongly recommended that you use the
       G25M-R.When doing the swap, you will need a new transmission anyway, so there's
       not really a point in using another F25M-R.

       Following is a list of Mazda part #'s of parts needed to perform the swap. This will give
       you an idea of what you'll need and should help you find the parts you need at a junk
       yard. Parts not mentioned are parts you will be reusing that are compatible. You will
       definately need an ECU meant for the Protegé's BP engine and wiring harness for the
       engine to run. The 2nd generation's BP ECU is OBD-II based, which may cause
       compatibility issues with the BP-ZET engine that was originally meant for a BG chassis
       car. An ECU and wiring harness from the 1st generation maybe a solution to this problem.
       If you want to use the G25M-R, here are the parts you'll need just to allow the engine
       and transmission to bolt in:
         Any G transmission from a 1st generation Protegé should work, but the 2nd generation's
         G25M-R is guaranteed to work.
         BC1F-39-020 #2 engine mount bracket (from 95 model)
         BC1F-39-030A #3 engine mount bracket (from 95 model)
         BC1F-39-035A #3 engine mount stay bracket
         BC1D-39-067 #4 engine mount corn mounting rubber washer (needs 3)
           (from 95 model)
         BC1E-39-100C #4 engine rubber mount (needs 3)
           (from 95 model)
         BC1F-39-090 #4 engine mount support bracket (from 95 model)
         9978-40-225 #4 engine mount support bracket bolt (needs 2)
           (from 95 model)
         GJ21-39-094 #4 engine mount support bracket bolt (from 95 model)
         GJ21-39-04XB manual transmission to engine bracket (from 95 model)
         9975-61-075 manual transmission to engine bracket bolt (needs 2)
           (from 95 model)
         F057-25-700 joint shaft
         BC2A-41-360B clutch pipe
         The following is only applicable to cars based on brake system (parts from 95 model):
           B01B-41-380A clutch line, non-ABS
           E020-41-380B clutch line, ABS
         BC1F-46-060 shifter linkage rod (from 95 model)
         The following is only applicable to cars based on brake system & VIN (parts from
         95 model):
           FA14-25-50X right axle, non-ABS (car # -161768)
           FA15-25-50X right axle, ABS (car # -161768)
           F066-25-500 right axle, non-ABS (car # 161768-)
           F066-25-50X right axle, ABS (car # 161768-)
         The following is only applicable to cars based on brake system (parts from 95 model):
           F065-25-60X left axle, non-ABS
           F066-25-60X left axle, ABS
       If you insist on using the F25M-R (which is fine if you are just swapping to the BP-ZE):
         You must get a F25M-R from a 1996-1998 BP engined Protegé
         The following is only applicable to specific cars based on VIN:
           BC1F-39-030B #3 engine mount bracket (car # -207729)
           BC1F-39-030C #3 engine mount bracket (car # 207729-)
         BC1F-39-035A #3 engine mount stay bracket
         FA08-25-700C joint shaft

       As for turbo placement for the BP engine (whether bolt on turbo to the BP-ZE or stock
       turbo from the BP-ZET), the plumbing work will have to be figured out yourself due to
       a much tighter engine bay in the 2nd generations. You can try using the hood scoop fed
       top mount intercooler from the turbo diesel 4E-EI equiped cars (in Europe and Japan)
       if there is major lack of room for an intercooler (which I highly doubt).
     3rd generations:
       For the first time, the Protegé got engines from the larger 626 car-- the FP and FS
       engines. These engines are physically larger and completely different from the B series
       engines used in past models. People who have the 1.6l ZM-DE engines will find that a
       swap to the FP or FS engine is cost prohibitive and difficult. Although there is  not too
       much involved in physically shoehorning the engine into the car, the difficulties and cost
       stem from the electrical and electronic components. Swapping to the BP or any other
       engine from any 3rd generation car is also extremely difficult and expensive as major
       custom fabrication is required. For the owners with the F series engines, swapping to
       the FS-ZE engine is a direct bolt on. The crank pulley must be swapped out with a US
       spec one if the stock ECU is to be used. For owners with the 1.8l FP-DE engine,
       swapping the transmission to the G15M-R one used in the newer 2001+ cars is
       possible as long as the axles and engine mounts are changed out. If you wish to
       experience the full power of the FS-ZE engine, you must swap out the wiring harness
       and ECU. Fortunately, it is now slightly easier to do this through the use of the Israeli
       FP-DE wiring harness. It is almost completely compatible with the FS-ZE ECU. Only
       a few wires will need to be changed! Obviously this harness has to be imported. The
       part number is BL5K-67-020B. It is for the automatic transmissions so it will have the
       extra wiring necessary if you are swapping the FS-ZE into an automatic car. This is the
       best near "plug and play" left hand drive engine harness available for our cars.
       Obviously you will also need the ECU. Here are the part numbers, which are useful
       even when you are buying a used ECU:
         FS6W-18-881B FWD automatic FS-ZE ECU
         FS7B-18-881A 4WD/FWD manual FS-ZE ECU

       The most physically direct swap for the 1.6l ZM-DE owners is getting the 1.5l ZL-VE
       engine from the Japanese market. It has the S-VT variable valve timing system.
       Getting the engine physically into the car is not a problem, everything bolts up. The
       problem is trying to run the engine with the S-VT. You must get the wiring harness
       and ECU to get it to run. At this time, there is not really an aftermarket ECU that will
       be able to control such a variable valve timing system. A Honda VTEC controller will
       not work. VTEC works in a 2 or 3 stage cam profile mode, while S-VT works like
       Toyota's continuously variable VVTi system. Do some research into aftermarket
       controllers for Toyota's VVTi system (they are the most plentiful continously variable
       valve timing engines available in the market). Anything made to control VVTi will
       work with S-VT, including the Haltech E11 ECU.

       For 1.6l ZM-DE owners insisting on swapping their engines to the FS engines, you
       will need the following in addition to the G15M-R transmission, wiring harnesses and
       ECU (this assumes you have a manual transmission and the FS engine you buy have
       the necessary motor mount bosses already installed onto the engine):
          BL3K-39-040 #1 engine rubber mount
          BL3K-39-06YA #3 engine rubber mount
          BL3K-39-070A #4 engine rubber mount
          BL3K-39-080G #4 engine mount bracket
          GA2A-41-380C clutch line
          BL3K-46-100 shifter mechanism
          GA15-25-700B joint shaft
        The following is only applicable to cars based on brake system:
          FA71-25-50X right axle, non-ABS
          FA61-25-50X right axle, ABS
          GD24-25-60XA left axle, non-ABS
          GD23-25-60XC left axle, ABS
       For the people wanting to use the F25M-R transmission for whatever odd reason:
         You must get a F25M-R from a 1999-2000 FP engined Protegé
         BJ0N-39-06YD #3 engine rubber mount
         FA54-25-700A joint shaft
         The following is only applicable to specific cars based on VIN:
           BJ0N-39-040C (car # -134481)
           B25D-39-040B(car # 134481-)
         For the brave souls who want to reuse their stock F25M-R transmission, you must
         swap the bell housing of the transmission. This basically means a transmission
         rebuild-- even if you are just reusing the internals. The part number for the bell
         housing side of the transmission is F5E1-17-150E. Do remember that the gear
         ratios between the 1.6l and 1.8l cars are different.


What engine internal parts are interchangable in the Protegé?
     1st generations:

       Any 1.6l Miata engine bottom end parts will work with the 1.6l engine in the 323.
       Any 1.8l Miata engine bottom end parts will work with the Protegé.
       Any 1.8l Miata (94-97 only) engine top end parts will work with the BP Protegé's.
       Any bottom end parts for the 1st generation Protegé are interchangable.
       MazdaSpeed 11.0:1 pistons for the BP-ZE are available (part #: QEP5-11-100)
     2nd generations:
       There are no interchangable parts for the Z5-DE engine.
       Any 1.8l Miata engine bottom end parts will work with the BP engined Protegé's.
       Any 1.8l Miata (94-97 only) engine top end parts will work with the BP Protegé's.
       Any bottom end parts for the 1st generation Protegé are interchangable with the BP
         engined Protegé's.
     3rd generation:
       Any ZL (1.5l) botom end parts will work with the 1.6l (ZM-DE) engine.
       The ZL-VE head (which has S-VT) is a direct swap to the ZM-DE engine. You will
         need to figure out a way to control the hydraulic controller that varies the intake cam
         timing. This system is similar to the one used in the 2001+ Miata BP-VE engines, so
         talk to the Miata guys about it the S-VT on their cars to learn more.
       Any ZL-DE top end parts will work with the ZM-DE engine.
       European spec ZM-DE 9.4:1 pistons are also available:
         ZMY1-11-SA0A normal size
         ZMY1-11-SB0A .025 oversize
         ZMY1-11-SBXA .050 oversize
       Most FP and FS engine parts are interchangable.
          As for FS-DE 9.7:1 (9.1:1 when used with FP-DE) pistons:
           FPY1-11-SA0E normal size
           FPY1-11-SB0E .025 oversize
           FPY1-11-SBXE .050 oversize
          As for FS-ZE 10.4:1 (9.7:1 when used with FP-DE) pistons:
           FPY2-11-SA0B normal size
           FPY2-11-SB0B .025 oversize
           FPY2-11-SBXB .050 oversize
          As for FS-ZE 10.7:1 pistons from the MazdaSpeed Familia:
           FSY4-11-SA0 normal size
           FSY4-11-SB0 .025 oversize
           FSY4-11-SBX .050 oversize
     Mazda3
           LF-DE 10.8:1 (European spec) pistons:
            LFY1-11-010 piston and rod set (not available separately and only in one size)
           LF-VE 10.8:1 pistons:
            LFY6-11-010 piston and rod set (not available separately and only in one size)
           L3-VE 10.6:1 (Japanese spec) pistons:
            L3Y2-11-010 piston and rod set (not available separately and only in one size)


I am rebuilding my FP-DE engine, is there a service manual available?
      Mazda never published a service manual for the FP engine in North America.
      However, since this engine is essentially a destroked version of the FS engine, you
      can use the FS engine service manual (part number 9999-95-193D-98). All specs-
      ifications are the same except for the connecting rod length and camshaft lobe height.
      The factory specification for the FP engine's connecting rod length is 129.2mm
      (5.087"). The factory specification for the intake camshaft lobe height is 43.0062mm
      (1.6931").


What is this "stroker kit" from MazdaSpeed I always hear about?
       In 1995, MazdaSpeed released Sports Kit parts for N2 race Miata racers. Parts
       not only consisted of suspension and chassis upgrades, but also engine parts. The
       BP-ZE engine was stroked to 1997cc and 250ps @ 8500rpm output was achieved.
       Torque output was also at 22.5kg·m @ 5500rpm. Supposedly, only 25% of BP-ZEs
       can be machined to accept the stroker kit due to manufacturing variations of the
       production engine blocks. Almost all of the parts have been discontinued since 2000.
       Some parts may still be available. The part numbers are:
         9E3B-10-271 cylinder head gasket (metal type, 0.7mm thickness)
         9E3A-12-440 exhaust camshaft (300º duration, 10.9mm lift)
         9E3A-12-421 camshaft blanks (journals are machined, but lobes are not)
         B6N7-12-42Y adjustable cam gears
         N0Y7-12-111 intake valve (35mm diameter)
         N0Y7-12-121 exhaust valve (31mm diameter)
         B6N7-12-120 valve spring (double spring: inner 1.01kgf/mm, outer 3.99kgf/mm)
         9E2A-12-183 valve lifter
         B6N7-12-113 upper valve spring seat (req. B660-12-114 OEM  retainers)
         B6N7-12-123C lower valve spring seat (req B660-12-123A x2 OEM seat)
         B6N7-12-551 shim (1.00mm)
         B6N7-12-552 shim (1.05mm)
         B6N7-12-553 shim (1.10mm)
         B6N7-12-554 shim (1.15mm)
         B6N7-12-555 shim (1.20mm)
         B6N7-12-556 shim (1.25mm)
         B6N7-12-557 shim (1.30mm)
         B6N7-12-558 shim (1.35mm)
         B6N7-12-559 shim (1.40mm)
         B6N7-12-560 shim (1.45mm)
         B6N7-12-561 shim (1.50mm)
         B6N7-12-562 shim (1.55mm)
         B6N7-12-563 shim (1.60mm)
         B6N7-12-564 shim (1.65mm)
         B6N7-12-565 shim (1.70mm)
         B6N7-12-566 shim (1.75mm)
         B6N7-12-567 shim (1.80mm)
         B6N7-12-568 shim (1.85mm)
         B6N7-12-569 shim (1.90mm)
         B6N7-12-570 shim (1.95mm)
         B6N7-12-571 shim (2.00mm)
         9E3A-11-100 piston (includes wrist pin, 12.6:1 comp. ratio)
         9E3A-11-12X piston ring set (
         9E3A-11-210 connecting rod (includes bolts, made by Farndon)
         9E3A-11-300 crankshaft (48mm main journals, for 50mm caps)
         N0Y7-11-351 main bearing (1.995-1.998mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-352 main bearing (1.998-2.001mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-353 main bearing (2.001-2.004mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-354 main bearing (2.004-2.007mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-355 main bearing (2.007-2.010mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-356 main bearing (2.010-2.013mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-357 main bearing (2.013-2.016mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-358 main bearing (2.016-2.019mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-359 main bearing (2.019-2.022mm thickness)
         9E2A-13-110 intake manifold (throttle body to cylinder head adapter)
         9E3A-13-640 throttle body set (50mm individual throttle bodies)
         9E3A-13-10Z air pipe set (50mm diameter, 50mm length)
         9E3A-13-640 throttle linkage
         N0Y7-11-225 connecting rod bearing (1.494-1.497mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-226 connecting rod bearing (1.497-1.500mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-227 connecting rod bearing (1.500-1.503mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-228 connecting rod bearing (1.503-1.506mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-229 connecting rod bearing (1.506-1.509mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-230 connecting rod bearing (1.509-1.512mm thickness)
         N0Y7-11-235 connecting rod bearing (1.512-1.515mm thickness)
         9E1D-14-700 oil cooler
         N370-13-250 fuel injector (from FC3S RX-7 Turbo II)
         BP55-13-150D fuel rail

       If lower lift cams are to be used as well as performing a MazdaSpeed solid
       lifter conversion, please use the B6N7-12-183 lifters. The shims, valve springs,
       and valve spring seats listed above are to be used with this lifter also.


What engine mounts are available for the Protegé?
     1st generations:

       Energy Suspension have mounts for the BP engined cars.
       MazdaSpeed also have mounts for the 1.8l DOHC cars. The part numbers are:
         B1Y1-39-040 #1 engine mount
         B1Y1-39-050 #2 engine mount
         B1Y1-39-060 #3 engine mount
         B1Y2-39-070 #4 engine mount
         B698-39-060 #3 engine mount (4WD and GT-X only)
         B698-39-070 #4 engine mount (4WD and GT-X only)
         B1Y1-28-680 differential mount, front (all 4WD only)
         B1Y1-28-690 differential mount, rear (all 4WD only)
         B1Y2-28-860 crossmember bushing (all 4WD only, needs 4)
     2nd generations:
       MazdaSpeed makes engine mounts for the 1.5l and 1.8l cars.
         The part numbers are:
         BCYD-39-040 #1 engine mount
         BCYD-39-060 #3 engine mount
         BCYD-39-070 #4 engine mount
         The #4 engine mount maybe incompatible with 1995 1.8l cars.
     3rd generations:
       AWR is the only company known to make polyurethane mounts for the 2.0L engine
       cars. They are replacements for the #1 and #2 engine mounts. AWR also recently
       released polyurethane inserts for the stock #3 and #4 engine mounts. If you have a
       2.0l manual transmission car, you can also get the #3 engine mount from the
       MazdaSpeed Protegé. They are made of a stiffer rubber material but still allow
       acceptable NVH levels for a daily/street driven vehicle. The MazdaSpeed #3 engine
       mount part number is BP7H-39-06Y. If you have a 1.8l or 2.0l automatic, you can
       use the 4WD Sport20 #3 engine mount instead. The part number is B26K-39-06YE.
       For some additional improvement while still maintaining near stock NVH levels for
       daily driving, a "roll damper" combined with the turbo diesel #2 engine mount can be
       used to further reduce drivetrain lash for 2.0L manual transmission and all 1.8L
       owners. Parts from different model variations will be used in order for this
       combination to be possible.
       The following parts are required::
           B28V-39-800B engine mount member (from automatic FWD FS-DE cars)
           B28V-39-990 roll damper (from AT FWD FS and AT & MT 4WD FS-ZE cars)
           GJ21-34-031 nut (from AT FWD FS and AT & MT 4WD FS-ZE cars)
           BJ3A-39-050C #2 engine mount (from European RF turbo diesel cars)
         For 2.0l manual transmission owners:
           B29A-39-020A #2 engine mount bracket (from AT & MT 4WD FS-ZE cars)
         For 1.8l automatic and manual transmission owners:
           B28V-39-020A #2 engine mount bracket (from automatic FWD FS cars)
       Some other parts not mentioned  that attach to the above parts listed will be reused.
       While this upgrade method may not be the most economical, it is by far the best
       way in avoiding increased NVH. As already mentioned, FWD 2.0L automatic cars
       already has the roll damper equiped, therefore the #2 turbo diesel engine mount is
       all that is needed.
     Mazda3's
      
A #1 engine mount is available from AWR in the 70 durometer and 88 durometer
       stiffness. Mazda also released slightly stiffer #3 and #4 engine mounts relating to the
       TSB 03-001/06. The part numbers are:
           BPYS-39-060 #3 engine mount (for LF engine)
           B3YT-39-060 #3 engine mount (for L3-VE engine)
           BPYN-39-070 #4 engine mount (for LF/L3 engines)
       These stiffer engine mounts are not installed in the factory. They are compatible with
       automatic equiped vehicles also.


What does "S-VT" mean?
     "Sequential Valve Timing". Please do not confuse it with "SVT" which is Ford's
     marketing label for their factory tuned vehicles. A good explaination of how the
     system works is found here. The 2001+ Miata engine also uses this same mechanism.


I live in a warm climate and I race my engine a lot, is there a way I can keep my oil from
getting too hot?

     You can install any aftermarket thermostat contolled oil cooler, or go with the OEM
     water cooled units. Having an oil cooler will increase oil life and maintain lubrication
     capabilities whether you race your engine or not. This may allow you to increase the
     oil change intervals, thus reducing cost and environmental waste. If you installed an
     aftermarket turbo/supercharger system to your car, it is strongly recommended that
     you install an oil cooler!
     1st generation:
       The BP engine already has an oil cooler, but
       you can upgrade to the GT-R unit (part number BPC8-14-700A). You will also
       need to change the oil filter mount pipe to a longer one (part number
       BPC8-10-319) in order to install the taller oil cooler unit. The 323's B6 engine is
       not equiped with oil coolers, but you can get one from an 1987-1989 323 GT and
       GT-X. As for the 1st generation's Protegé's BP-ME engine, you can transfer the oil
       cooler unit from the BP-ZE engine.
     2nd generations:
       There is not an OEM oil cooler available for the Z5
       engine at all, but you can get the 1st generation's BP engine oil cooler to install into
       the 2nd generation's BP engine. Remember that installing these OEM oil coolers
       requires various coolant lines and therefore require some prior knowledge as to
       where the coolant will be routed.
     3rd generations:
       There is an OEM oil cooler for the ZM engine, but it will have to be imported from
       Israeli-spec 323. This unit has coolant running from the cylinder head to the
       throttle body then detouring to the oil cooler before exiting back to the by-pass
       pipe. In absence of the oil cooler, there is just a coolant return line coming from the
       throttle body straight to the by-pass pipe. The part numbers are as follows:
         FE3N-14-700B oil cooler
         9992-22-000 nut (you will need an extra one to aid installation/removal of the
           oil filter mount pipe)
         B6BF-15-538 line clamp (need 4)
         ZL06-15-546 coolant return hose (connected to by-pass pipe)
         ZM13-15-536A coolant inlet hose (connected from throttle body)
         NA01-61-435 band
         BP4W-10-319 oil filter mount pipe
       As for the the FP and FS engines, you can get the OEM oil cooler unit from the
       MazdaSpeed Protegé. You will most likely have to buy the parts brand new
       because of such rarity of the MazdaSpeed Protegé being in a junk yard.
       The part numbers are as follows:
         FS05-14-700 oil cooler (or FSH9-14-700; larger oil cooler from European 626)
         B6BF-15-538 line clamp (need 4)
         9992-22-000 nut (you will need an extra one to aid installation/removal of the
           oil filter mount pipe)
         FS05-15-54XA coolant return hose
         FS05-15-536A coolant inlet hose
         FSM3-15-290C coolant by-pass pipe
         JE26-15-520 coolant line tap
         9956-21-200 gasket washer
         E5B6-10-319C oil filter mount pipe
         E301-15-287 coolant by-pass pipe o-ring
        I have written how-to instructions for installing the FP/FS engine oil cooler and
        you can find them here.
     Mazda3
       The European/Mexican/Israeli spec oil cooler can be used with both the 2.0l and 2.3l
       engines. Oil pressure concerns are not a worry-- the 2nd generation Mazda3 will all
       use the spin-on filters for both the LF-VE and L5-VE engines, which both have
       similar lubrication flow characteristics as the 1st generations.
       The following part numbers also convert the oil filter to the spin-on type if you
       currently have the catridge filter:
         LFD7-14-700 oil cooler (for BK/1st gen models and BL/2nd gen manual models only)
         LF8W-14-700 oil cooler (for BL/2nd gen automatic models only)
         L311-14-311 oil filter mount
         9XG0-64-877L bolt
         LF01-14-342 gasket
         LF05-14-302A oil filter (spin-on type)
         LFD7-15-54YD coolant reservoir tank to oil cooler hose (for BK/1st gen models only)
         LF8W-15-54YB coolant reservoir tank to oil cooler hose (for BL/2nd gen AT only)
         LFAT-15-54YA coolant reservoir tank to oil cooler hose (for BL/2nd gen MT only)
         LFF7-15-53XA engine oil cooler to transmission oil cooler hose (BK automatics only)
         L541-15-53X engine oil cooler to transmission oil cooler hose (BL automatics only)
         L33X-15-53X heater hose (manual transmissions only)
         9WNC-B2-400B clamp (for heater return pipe to oil cooler hose, manual trans only)
         B32T-61-242 clamp (for heater return hose to oil cooler, manual trans only)
       If you have the 2.3l and wish to retain the cartridge type oil filter:
         LFD7-14-700 oil cooler 
         LF03-14-310A oil filter mount
         LF01-14-342 gasket
         9XG0-64-877L bolt
         LFD7-15-54YD coolant reservoir tank to oil cooler hose
         LFF7-15-53XA engine oil cooler to transmission oil cooler hose (automatics only)
         L33X-15-53X heater hose (manual transmissions only)
         9WNC-B2-400B clamp (for heater return pipe to oil cooler hose, manual trans only)
         B32T-61-242 clamp (for heater return hose to oil cooler, manual trans only)
       I have written how-to instructions for installing L series engine oil cooler which you
       can find here.


I hate changing oil on my 2.3l Mazda3, the cartridge filter is messy. Is there anything
I can do about it?

     You can convert to the spin-on oil filter used in the new 2.3l JDM version. When
     using the spin-on filter, be sure to use 5W30 motor oil, not the US-spec 5W20
     recommendation. The spin-on filter has different flow characteristics than the
     cartridge based filter, therefore using 5W30 (as recommended in the Japanese
     and European markets) will ensure the proper oil pressure and flow rates. Use of
     the spin-on filter will allow easier sourcing of aftermarket oil filters as well as lower
     costs. Oil pressure concerns are not a worry-- the 2nd generation Mazda3 will all
     use the spin-on filters for both the LF-VE and L5-VE engines, which both have
     similar lubrication flow characteristics as the 1st generations.
     The part numbers are:
       L302-14-311 oil filter mount
       LF01-14-342 gasket
       LF05-14-302A oil filter
     For MazdaSpeed3 or 06-09 European/Mexican/G.C.C./Middle East owners:
       L311-14-311 oil filter mount
       LF01-14-342 gasket
       LF05-14-302A oil filter


The stock radiator doesn't cool well enough for my high performance needs, are
there any radiator upgrades for the Protegé?

     PWR and AWR makes radiators specific to the 3rd generation Protegé. Koyo also
     has a radiator for the 2nd generation 1.8l Protegé.
     For OEM solutions, heavy duty radiators from diesel or Middle Eastern countries
     can be imported.
     1st generations:
        GT-R/GT-X radiator: BP26-15-200G
        GT-R/GT-X fan blade: BP26-15-140A
        GT-R/GT-X fan shroud: BP26-15-210A
        GT-R/GT-X fan motor: BP26-15-150B
     2nd generations:
        Radiator (manual transmissions): B6FN-15-200
        Radiator (automatic transmissions with A/C): BPG2-15-200
        Raidator: (automatic transmissions without A/C): BPM7-15-200
        Radiator fan blade (used in carbureted auto 86-87 323 and 4 speed auto
            86-87 626): F622-15-141
        Radiator fan motor (used in Israeli spec cars; must be imported): B6BG-15-150
      3rd generations:
        Non-turbo diesel radiator (manual transmissions with A/C): RF1S-15-200B
        Non-turbo diesel radiator (manual transmissions without A/C): RF2L-15-200C
        Non-turbo diesel radiator (automatic transmissions with A/C: RF1V-15-200C
        Non-turbo diesel radiator (automatic transmissions without A/C: RF1W-15-200A
          Note: non-turbo diesel radiators must be used with the non-turbo diesel fans or
          fans from the MazdaSpeed Protegé's as well as its radiator hoses and brackets.
          1.6L cars will need to fabricate radiator hoses for proper fitment. Mounting the
         
MazdaSpeed Protegé radiator fan will require some fabrication due to the
          shroud being designed for fitting over the intercooler.
            RF1S-15-240 right radiator bracket
            FSAX-15-250 left radiator bracket (from MazdaSpeed
Protegé)
            And:
            FSAX-15-186 upper radiator hose (rubber)

            Or:
            0000-88-C70 lower radiator hose (silicone; from MazdaSpeed Protegé)
            0000-88-C71 upper radiator hose (silicone; from MazdaSpeed Protegé)
            And:
            FSAX-15-025 radiator fan assembly (from MazdaSpeed
Protegé)
            FSAX-15-035C condenser fan assembly (from MazdaSpeed
Protegé)
            Or:
            RF1S-15-025B radiator fan assembly (from non-turbo diesel)
            RF4R-15-035C condenser fan assembly (from turbo diesel)
           The diesel fans do not flow as much air as the MazdaSpeed
Protegé ones, if
           maximum cooling is desired, get the MazdaSpeed
Protegé fans. Mounting the
          
MazdaSpeed Protegé radiator fan will require some fabrication due to the
           shroud being designed for fitting over the intercooler. You can also import the
           non-turbo diesel radiator fan shroud (RF1S-15-210B) then swap the fan and
           motor parts over to achieve a perfect fit.


       When not using the non-turbo diesel radiator (fan upgrade or using PWR/AWR
       radiators):
          Condenser fan motor (used in MSPs and Israeli spec cars): RF1W-15-150
            Or the condenser fan assembly (if available in your country): FP55-15-035F
          Radiator fan motor (used in MSPs and 2.5L 99-02 Millenias): RF1V-15-150
          Radiator fan blade (used in 2.5L 99-02 Millenias): RF1V-15-140
            Or the radiator fan assembly (if available in your country): FP55-15-025B
      Mazda3
        Radiator (found in 07-09 automatic versions & MazdaSpeed3's): L33X-15-200



I've upgraded the radiator and the engine still gets really hot (almost boil), is there
any way to further improve the cooling?

    A larger capacity radiator from the same model year can help. Automatic
    transmission cars have slightly larger radiators. A bottle of Red Line Water
    Wetter can also bring the temperature down a bit (this has been proven). 
    Having 100% full distilled water in your coolant system will greatly improve
    cooling at the track. DO NOT use 100% water continuously on the street, the
    water may freeze in cold weather and will also rust out your coolant system.
    It is not recommended to use Water Wetter (pink colored) with antifreeze as it
    contains silicates. Silicates is an corrosion inhibitor that is found in antifreeze for
    domestic vehicles. Mazda, like other Japanese makers do not use silicates in
    their factory fill (nor official branded replacement sold at dealers) and claim that
    silicates harm water pump bearings/seals as well as cause deposits in the radiator.
    Also, adverse effects may occur when you mix corrosion inhibitors, so please take
    this caution very seriously! This warning applies to non-Mazdas also!
    However, don't dispair, Red Line also makes Diesel Water Wetter that is form-
    ulated without the silicates corrosion inhibitor as it is designed specifically for use
    with antifreeze (whereas the normal Water Wetter isn't). It comes more
    concentrated, and is in a dark green/black color. Just 1 to 2 ounces is enough for
    the entire system!

    A high pressure radiator cap will raise the boiling point also. Any cap for a
    Nippon Denso or Calsonic (depending on which kind you have; check the
    stamping on your radiator to see) radiator should work. Stock pressure is
    0.9-1.1 bar.
    MazdaSpeed also makes radiator caps if you don't want to bother looking for
    one. The pressure is rated at 1.3 bar. Applications is as follows:
      1st generations: QA1D-15-205 (for Calsonic radiators, in most Protegé's)
                              QAB5-15-205A (for Denso radiators, in 323 and
                                 some Protegé's)
      2nd generations: QA1D-15-205 (Automatic transmissions)
                               QAB5-15-205A (Manual transmissions)
      3rd generations: QA1D-15-205 (Automatic transmissions)
                               QAB5-15-205A (Manual transmissions)
    The Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo (Z32) radiator cap is also a cheap alternative.
    It is rated at 1.2 bar and fits all Calsonic radiators. You can also get the 1.3 bar
    radiator cap off a MazdaSpeed6, the part number is LF21-15-205 and fits all
    Calsonic radiators.

    Just remember when using a high pressure cap, you MUST idle the
    engine for a few minutes after a hard run. If you shut off the engine
    without letting it idle, the fluid in you radiator may boil over. Idling
    must be done so that the fluid in your coolant system has time to cool down
    and circulate.

    MazdaSpeed has released performance thermostats for the FP, FS, RF diesel,
    and B & K series engines under the "B-Spec" performance level. This should
    help coolant flow a bit better. Does not effect emissions in its operation range
    under Japan's MLIT standards.
    For the FP, FS, RF, and K series engines, the part number is QBJ1-15-171
    For the B series, Z5, ZL, and ZM engines, the part number is QNB1-15-171
    Both thermostats begins to open at 68゚C. The stock thermostat begins to open
    at 82゚C for the F series engines, 85゚C for the 95-98 BP, Z5, ZL, ZM engines,
    and 88゚C for the B6, BP-ME, BP-ZE, BP-ZET and other B series engines. These
    thermostats are discontinued and any still available are "new old stock".
    It appears that the only alternative now are aftermarket "alternate temperature"
    thermostats that are found at your local parts store. The coldest one known to
    fit the FP, FS, RF, and K series engines is one with a 76.7゚C initial opening
    temperature. For the B series, Z5, ZL, and ZM engines, there are far more
    solutions available since the Miata is a popular car to modify. You can easily
    find a 71゚C initial opening temperature thermostat at your local parts store, or
    look for a HKT, ARC, or SARD JDM thermostat that basically is the same as
    the MazdaSpeed one.

    Another thing you can do is install the water cooled oil cooler unit from the
    MazdaSpeed Protegé. It is installed at the base of the oil filter and coolant lines
    (which you must get) feed the jacket to cool the oil and the filter down.
    Additionally, you can also get an aftermarket air cooled oil cooler.


Are there any underdrive pullies available?
     Unorthodox Racing makes underdrive pullies however it is not recommended to
     use any underdrive crank pullies from any company at all because it can cause
     oil pump failures. All Protege engines are directly crank driven and if an under-
     drive crank pulley is used, it can cause accelerated wear in it which will event-
     ually lead to failure! Typical underdrive crank pullies do not have a harmonic
     balancer and therefore all the oscillating forces from the crankshaft are
     transmitted elsewhere. Even on the typically well balanced stock crankshafts,
     there is always a very slight imbalance in them and as such the forces caused by
     them results in the oscillations. Many turbo Miata engines have blown up from
     oil pump failures due to the installation of underdrive crank pullies. Be warned!


Where is the fuel filter?
       1st generations: on the firewall near the brake master cylinder.
          part numbers: BP01-13-480 (FWD 1.8l, US/Canada 1.6l)
                                BP26-13-480 (4WD)
                                B6S7-13-480 (1.3l/1.5l EGI Japan)
                                B366-13-470A (carburetor)
                                PN47-13-ZA5 (diesel, General Market)
                                RF83-13-ZA5 (diesel, Europe)
                                PN12-13-ZA5 (diesel, Japan)


       2nd generations: on the firewall in the area just above where the alternator is.
          part numbers: B6BF-13-480 (FWD)
                               1456-23-570A (diesel)
                                B595-13-480 (Japan)
                                B6DG-13-480 (4WD)
                                PN17-13-ZA5A (diesel, General Market)


       3rd generations: FWD gasoline fuel filter is built inside the fuel pump housing.
                                The fuel pump unit is installed to the fuel tank and is accessible
                                by removing the access panel under the rear seat. You will need
                                to actually remove the fuel pump from the original housing and
                                transfer it to the new one.
          part numbers: GY01-13-ZE0 filter
          (Japan FWD/ ZL02-13-ZE1 pickup sock
          US/Canada/  FEH2-13-ZE4 retaining lock washer (pickup sock req'd)
          Australia/       ZL01-13-ZE5 rubber seal kit
          R.O.W.)        B25D-42-166 fuel pump housing gasket

          part numbers: ZL05-20-490A filter
          (Europe/        ZL05-13-ZE1A pickup sock
          China)           B6BF-13-ZE4  retaining lock washer (pickup sock req'd)
                              
B25D-42-166  fuel pump housing gasket
                               ZL05-13-ZE5A rubber seal kit

          diesel part number: R2L1-13-ZA5A
          4WD part number: ZL03-13-480


        Mazda3: not replaceable in US/Canada/Europe/Japan, it is part of the fuel pump
                      unit. Australian/General Market Mazda3's have an externally located fuel
                      filter near the fuel tank.
           part number: Z605-20-490C
           1.6l diesel part numbers: Y602-13-480A (before 2005/12/01 build)
                                                Y603-13-480 (after 2005/12/01 build)
           2.0l diesel part number: R2N5-13-ZA5


     Mazda Japan recommends fuel filter replacement every 160,000km/
     100,000 miles or 96 months (whichever comes first) on 3rd generations and
     non-US/Canada Mazda3's under normal service. A 75,000km/45,000 miles or
     60 months (whichever comes first) fuel filter replacement is recommended where
     clean quality fuel is not frequently available. For developing countries where very
     poor quality fuel is only available, a 40,000km/25,000 miles or 24 months
     (whichever comes first) interval should be used instead.

     For diesel models,Mazda Europe recommends fuel filter replacement every
     45,000km/28,100 miles or 36 months (whichever comes first) for BG/BHA/BJ 323
     diesel models and 60,000km/37,500 miles or 36 months (whichever comes first) for
     Mazda3 diesel models. For other countries (except Japan), a 40,000km/25,000 miles
     or 24 months (whichever comes first) for Mazda3 diesel models is recommended
     instead.


My ECU keeps giving me EGR trouble codes, can I get rid of the EGR system?
     Removing the EGR valve will result in the EGR valve malfunction trouble code be
     permanently set. It will also cause the "check engine" light to be permanently on.
     It is not advised to remove the EGR system as it does not hinder performance
     and in some cases help improve fuel economy due to reduced pumping losses of
     the engine. The EGR system only works at partial throttle at steady speeds. If
     you insist on removing the EGR system because of repeated problems after
     multiple repair attempts, it is possible to do that but you will get the results that
     were mentioned. If you are going to run an aftermarket ECU system, then you
     can remove the EGR system without problems.
     The following parts are needed:
       JE41-20-301 EGR valve block off plate (must be imported)
       JE27-20-305A EGR valve gasket
       9979-40-820 bolt (2 needed)


I am shopping for a good condition used import engine. What are the compression
pressure test specifications?

     Since JDM/EDM service manuals are very hard to get, here are the compression test
     specifications for the most popular imported engines:
    
Engine Designation
Comp.
Ratio

Standard
kPa (kgf/cm²) {psi}
Minimum
kPa (kgf/cm²) {psi}
Maximum Difference
kPa (kgf/cm²) {psi}
B5-DE [Automatic]
B5-ZE [Automatic]
9.0:1
1314 (13.4) {191}
981 (10.0) {142} 196 (2.0) {28}
B5-DE [Manual]
B5-ZE [Manual]
9.4:1
1334 (13.6) {193}
981 (10.0) {142} 196 (2.0) {28}
B6-ZE
10.0:1
1471 (15.0) {213} 1030 (10.5) {149} 196 (2.0) {28}
BP-ZE [leaded fuel]
9.8:1
1353 (13.8) {196}
981 (10.0) {142} 196 (2.0) {28}
BP-ZET
8.2:1
1127 (11.5) {164}
785 (8.0) {114}
196 (2.0) {28}
FP-DE (Europe)
9.7:1
1373 (14.0) {199} 1079 (11.0) {156}
196 (2.0) {28}
FS-DE (EU/AU/TW)
9.7:1
1471 (15.0) {213}
1030 (10.5) {149}
196 (2.0) {28}
FS-ZE
10.4:1
1569.1 (16.0) {228}
1098.3 (11.2) {159}
196 (2.0) {28}
FS-ZE (MazdaSpeed)
10.7:1
1667.1 (17.0) {242}
1098.3 (11.2) {159} 196 (2.0) {28}
ZL-VE
ZL-DE (Europe)
9.4:1
1373 (14.0) {199}
981 (10.0) {142}
196 (2.0) {28}
ZM-DE (Europe/China)
9.7:1
1400 (14.3) {203}
981 (10.0) {142} 196 (2.0) {28}
All specifications are at where 300r/min during compression test is assumed.


© 2001-2011 Edwin Man et al. All rights reserved. No part maybe reproduced in any format without permission.